3eqm

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3eqm, resolution 2.90Å ()
Ligands: , ,
Activity: Unspecific monooxygenase, with EC number 1.14.14.1
Resources: FirstGlance, OCA, RCSB, PDBsum
Coordinates: save as pdb, mmCIF, xml


Contents

Crystal structure of human placental aromatase cytochrome P450 in complex with androstenedione

Publication Abstract from PubMed

Aromatase cytochrome P450 is the only enzyme in vertebrates known to catalyse the biosynthesis of all oestrogens from androgens. Aromatase inhibitors therefore constitute a frontline therapy for oestrogen-dependent breast cancer. In a three-step process, each step requiring 1 mol of O(2), 1 mol of NADPH, and coupling with its redox partner cytochrome P450 reductase, aromatase converts androstenedione, testosterone and 16alpha-hydroxytestosterone to oestrone, 17beta-oestradiol and 17beta,16alpha-oestriol, respectively. The first two steps are C19-methyl hydroxylation steps, and the third involves the aromatization of the steroid A-ring, unique to aromatase. Whereas most P450s are not highly substrate selective, it is the hallmark androgenic specificity that sets aromatase apart. The structure of this enzyme of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane has remained unknown for decades, hindering elucidation of the biochemical mechanism. Here we present the crystal structure of human placental aromatase, the only natural mammalian, full-length P450 and P450 in hormone biosynthetic pathways to be crystallized so far. Unlike the active sites of many microsomal P450s that metabolize drugs and xenobiotics, aromatase has an androgen-specific cleft that binds the androstenedione molecule snugly. Hydrophobic and polar residues exquisitely complement the steroid backbone. The locations of catalytically important residues shed light on the reaction mechanism. The relative juxtaposition of the hydrophobic amino-terminal region and the opening to the catalytic cleft shows why membrane anchoring is necessary for the lipophilic substrates to gain access to the active site. The molecular basis for the enzyme's androgenic specificity and unique catalytic mechanism can be used for developing next-generation aromatase inhibitors.

Structural basis for androgen specificity and oestrogen synthesis in human aromatase., Ghosh D, Griswold J, Erman M, Pangborn W, Nature. 2009 Jan 8;457(7226):219-23. PMID:19129847

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Disease

[CP19A_HUMAN] Defects in CYP19A1 are a cause of aromatase excess syndrome (AEXS) [MIM:139300]; also known as familial gynecomastia. AEXS is characterized by an estrogen excess due to an increased aromatase activity. Defects in CYP19A1 are the cause of aromatase deficiency (AROD) [MIM:613546]. AROD is a rare disease in which fetal androgens are not converted into estrogens due to placental aromatase deficiency. Thus, pregnant women exhibit a hirsutism, which spontaneously resolves after post-partum. At birth, female babies present with pseudohermaphroditism due to virilization of extern genital organs. In adult females, manifestations include delay of puberty, breast hypoplasia and primary amenorrhoea with multicystic ovaries.[1][2][3]

Function

[CP19A_HUMAN] Catalyzes the formation of aromatic C18 estrogens from C19 androgens.

About this Structure

3eqm is a 1 chain structure with sequence from Homo sapiens. Full crystallographic information is available from OCA.

See Also

Reference

  • Ghosh D, Griswold J, Erman M, Pangborn W. Structural basis for androgen specificity and oestrogen synthesis in human aromatase. Nature. 2009 Jan 8;457(7226):219-23. PMID:19129847 doi:10.1038/nature07614
  1. Ito Y, Fisher CR, Conte FA, Grumbach MM, Simpson ER. Molecular basis of aromatase deficiency in an adult female with sexual infantilism and polycystic ovaries. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1993 Dec 15;90(24):11673-7. PMID:8265607
  2. Morishima A, Grumbach MM, Simpson ER, Fisher C, Qin K. Aromatase deficiency in male and female siblings caused by a novel mutation and the physiological role of estrogens. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1995 Dec;80(12):3689-98. PMID:8530621
  3. Carani C, Qin K, Simoni M, Faustini-Fustini M, Serpente S, Boyd J, Korach KS, Simpson ER. Effect of testosterone and estradiol in a man with aromatase deficiency. N Engl J Med. 1997 Jul 10;337(2):91-5. PMID:9211678 doi:10.1056/NEJM199707103370204

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